Dia Seis – A Physically Challenging Trip to Teo

In the morning, we did repeat performances at the El Pinal school of deworming medicine, fluoride treatment, and tooth brushing demonstrations for 43 kindergarten to 6th grade children in 3 classrooms.  We left additional toothbrushes for those who were absent.

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This afternoon we visited Texoxingales, the most remote of the villages that HAF supports.  During the 1-hour drive, we stopped at a scenic overlook, where we could see the whole Quimistan Valley below.  We couldn’t pick out Q’town, but the vista was superb!
Upon our arrival, the local citizen’s group gathered, and we first looked at the school kitchen, where they would like to build the first two Justa stoves.
We then proceeded to a nearby classroom for our scheduled meeting.  We got all of our questions answered, and I believe we have lots of information about their water needs and other potential projects, which will be reported at the Board meeting next week.  It was a good meeting, with about 3 dozen adults from the village attending, and numerous curious children about.

Afterward, we hiked up to the water tank, which was a steep, narrow trail.
Dane volunteered to hike beyond there to the new water source, over a kilometer away, in order to photograph it and estimate the distance and elevation drop to the tank.  Also, Dane learned that he was severely out of shape, compared to these rugged locals.
Our last stop was at the home of the community leader, where we were served a wonderful chicken soup, tortillas, rice, and roasted chicken.
 
Finally, Tommy broke out the bubbles and made some more new friends.
We returned to home base tired but blessed by our visit.
George